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to the imperial interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americans step in because of the vacuum or because they were asked? >> the story of british control shepherding over the golf plays itself out over 20 years. in 1968 the british announced the impending withdrawal in three years the americans initially said in very it explicit terms will not replace the british. the januar
to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, was one of british control over the persian gulf. and it was in the aftermath of world war world car -- world war ii, the british began their slow, prolonged entrend. in the gulf. with the independence of india in the late 1940s, the british lost the rationale for the military presence in the gulf, and they lost to a degree the money to pay for the military presence that maintained order for so long. >> host: did th
, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the baton to the united states after pearl harbor, and roughly 1815 until
and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurricane the uproar industrial policies to promote solar and wind undesirable to create opportunities for poli
called oval challenges. so just one is a gentleman who is an optometrist in southern india and in the late 1970s he retired and ss retirement project he was about 57 and wanted to descend before his community. and so he decided he was going to try to address the problem of needless blindness due to cataracts. in the united states as an outpatient operation. you don't have people blind due to cataracts. and the rest of the world there's a hundred million people blind due to cataracts. so this is not a was no wanted to address. so we started the clinic in his home in yet another benson family members hope to make up this thing off the ground. forward not just one or two or three great ideas, but hundreds of innovations. tenacity of an entire community, global team of people, one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox. david greene. all these people built together to build the hospital and to this day, the hospital has secured 3 million people of blindness. i do imagine the entire washington metro area of about 3 million people. imagine all those people bl
five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy. we are raising electricity costs. we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and fluorescent lightbulbs. the cost of this falls disproportionately on to those who are least able to afford it. the lowest of the income distribution according to recent data assessme
explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and had come out to see the second lady and see the united states to study. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. there, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party they were out in the engagement they were going to or not is important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in th
. the china and burma india theater. and if the special operations started with the oss in china and world war ii. oss also established the foundation for some of the intelligence framework that pos it to china for example. they are a training of the younger experts and those peopl ter world war to become the leading authorities of the american intelligence as well as the government policy services, so those are very big contributions. they also have some other lessons and grounders as well. >> what was one of the blunders >> one of the things is that i would say oss is trying so hard to establish itself as legitimate. they're always trying to constantly. for example, its independence from the liberation intelligence. the are too reliant upon th british intelligence. now for the intelligence analysis to the intelligence service is also a flaw itself. it works both ways. that's because once you add this analysis to the service. it's very fanatical. in other words it is not just to inform, it is to predic
is a gentleman who was an optometrist in southern india and in the late 1970s he retired and does his retirement project, he was about 57 and he wanted to do something for his community. and so he decided he was going to try to address the problem is needless blindness due to cataracts. in the united states of the minor outpatient operation. you don't have people blind to the cataracts. and the rest of the world are super hundred million people blind due to cataracts. this is something that brought her view was known wanted to address. so he started the clinic and is held and he had a sudden basden family members helped him and he got the thing the ground. anyway, come forward not just one or two or three great ideas, but hundreds of innovations. tenacity of an entire community, an entire global of people, one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox. cannot you put your name david greene. all these people work together to build the arvind iyer of hospital. to this day, the hospital has killed her than 3 million people of blindness. now come to you imagine the entire washingto
at and the engagement they were going were not as important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. the greater scheme of things it's a small act but it left a lasting impression on the woman involved. the indian woman involved and on the women in the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we know about the event. through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job. one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of the work and helping to raise funds for the party. she found many of the tasks frustrating and mind numbing. by the end of the first term she expressed the friends reentry to the work force. she wrote i would like to do part-time work rather than the useless work i'm expected to do. the thrill of meeting famous men and women and the glamour of white tie dinners wore off leaving only the tiring routine of constant evenings away from the girls, ielgd chatter with women she didn't always like. for someone that worked hard her entire life, she
was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job as a political wife. second, this is not the wife of ambassador or statesmen. she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact server trouble to import people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sinister sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her will when she could take action. the party of the nixon's in the engagem
so long as done consistently. that's perfectly all right. one system i like is in place in india all passengers get a full manual pat down in a curtain booth by a member of the same-sex who is clearly trained to be courteous and respectful. private stores or other organizations who feel that the bulky clothing is a theft whether of shoplifting or terrorism could substitute a rule banning floor-length coats. they could have a body scanner the the door. but they don't presumably preferring customer friendliness to the extra margin of safety. what i want to establish is the discrimination inherent in the belief that it poses a unique security risk. reasonable security policy apply to similar cases are perfectly fine. a reasonable demand would be that a muslim womb -- woman have a full face photograph with suitable protection for modest i did during the photosession such a photoshould be required and most islamic scholars grow. i don't think it would be incompatible with equal liberty. however, we also know by now that the face is a very bad identifier. at immigration check point bs, eye
aspect of that. for example, offered the most successful u.s. special operations in china, burma, india theater. and you can say, special operations started with dos as experience in china during world war ii. and oss also established some of the intelligence from work, the approach to china, for example, the file data system, there training of the young your experts, and those people after rld war to become the leading authorities of maritime intelligence as well as government policy. so those are very big contributions. also some other lessons and some big blunders as well. >> what is one of the blunders? >> well, one of the things is i will say, oss in trying so hard to establish itself as legitimate, tried to prove to others, always constantly trying to prove to others it's worth the importance. in doing so, sometimes the sacrifice of the original mission. for example, its independence om the british intelligence, true reliance upon the british intelligence. the other thing is, oss success
was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india in a few days and was hoping to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arrange for the woman to be given a speech after dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to previous engagement. i use this the story to begin my top because i think several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as a foreign diploma
of was something else. what was going in india at that time was not an islamic buddy in the. one important aspect of that was to raise the issue of authenticity. what was an authentic indian, anti-odds was only the hand experience of india was authentically indian. and what that meant was all the minorities was the largest minority among the minority. were in some way an authentic. i found that very annoying. and so i thought i would take a very small minority, which is a south indian jewish community. and then create an even smaller minority by having somebody from that community mary into a south indian catholic family, thus creating a catholic-a jewish individuals probably a minority of one person in a country of a billion people. and then show that you could actually grow the whole experience of india out of that one person. you know, so that everybody in indian is authentically indian. that's what it wanted to say. and not just any particular devotional group. [applause] >> i mean, the novel came out of that desire to rescue what it was to an indian from the logic of this kind of attack. >>
they finally accused of something it was breaking of foreign regulation, a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized and the u.s. for breaking a law in india does the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have. one of them is the case of a couple selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. there were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our website, $90,000. if you don't take in 30 days 00s over $3 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government is doing to bully people demand we, frankly, think it needs to stop. they did the same with compass getting people's land insane, you can build on it because it's a wet land even though there is no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator what can you do to change policy? >> we have looked as some of these things, and we know constructive legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands we save, the clean water act says you cannot discharge pollutants into navigable waters. i don't have any problem w
, places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. the places that are conduits and where india has transformed itself from a city that is a synonym of poverty to a place of opportunity. this is something of a paradox. we live in an age in which distance is dead and every one of us could telecommute into whatever business employs us. occupying and, living in whatever appeals to us, and yet in so many ways and cases, we choose the urban life. we choose the inconveniences and the high cost of living in urban areas despite the fact that 20 years ago it was predicted that all this new technology would make cities obsolete. yet, google, which of all the companies in the world, with a few? rebuild the google collects. silicon valley. the most famous geographic cluster in the world is also the industry that is the most technologically savvy. why is it that all of this new technology, far from making contact in the city, seems to be hyper charging the city? this relatively rosy view is very unlike the new york of my youth. i was born in manhattan in 1967. i say that rarely in the boston
and citizenship. peoples of egypt india algeria clearly did not fit the progressives view of the educated elite and by their definition they were close to quote life unworthy of life unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers found and even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies call it a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism, god, fair play and they avoided sensationalism and other things. american movie sold american exceptionalism, including quote puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally made fun of those values to the work of people such as buster keaton and charlie chaplin but this was all done tongue-in-cheek and never meant to totally undermined the system itself. by 1930, the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to frances 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply get.compete with hollywood and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wan
of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not forget the progressives' view of educated elites and by their definitions were close to, quote, unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american sensualism including, quote, puritanical mormonism, as one put it. they occasionally made fun of those values through the work of buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was never meant to totally undermine the system itself. by 1930 the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to france's 2400 and britain's 3,000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wanted to be like mik
with the nixons were going to were not as important at that moment is getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. this is really a small act, but it left a lasting impression on the indian woman involved and on the women at the table that she was eventually ceded back. how we know about this is through a letter with some and she ended up sitting wet and wrote later about. on occasion she was proud of the work she found many other tasks frustrating and mindnumbing. by the end of the first term, she expressed her jealousy of her friends reentry into the workforce. she wrote that i would like to do part-time work rather than all the useless gabbing about that i am expected to do. the thrill of meeting famous men and women in the grammar of white tie dinners at the white house were off. leaving idle chatter with women that she did not always lie. she was someone who worked hard her entire life and should have done so. the situation could at times be intolerable. it was not the physical challenges await her down. she resented not being the useful in doing something meaningf
to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which too often remain mired in the poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almost all of its existence. it is the cities, it is bangalore, mumbai, it is delhi that are the places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. they are the places that are the conduits, the channels across civilizations and continents and the place where india's transforming itself from a place that was practically a synonym for poverty and deprivation to a place that is bubbling with opportunity. now, in some success -- in some sense, it's something of a paradox. distance is dead, every single one of us could just telecommute in to whatever, you know, whatever business employs us. occupying in whatever spot appeals to our biofill ya, and yet in so many cases we choose urban life. we choose the inconveniences, the high cost of living in urban areas despite the fact that all this new technology would make cities obsolete, it was predicted, and yet bag google w
is getting this visitor from india a seat at the. in the greater scheme of things, it's really a small act, but it left a lasting impression on indian woman involved in women at the table that she was eventually seated at. the how we actually know about the event when she ended up sitting with responded and wrote later about it. politics is their job and when she didn't always enjoy. one occasion she was proud of her work in helping to a sense for the party, she found many frustrating and mindnumbing. by the end of the first term she expressed her jealousy of her friends reentry into the workforce. she will come out with a to do part-time work rather than all the useless gapping and expected to do. meeting famous men and women and claim our dinners at the white house not only 13 of constant away from chatter with him and she didn't always like. for someone who had worked her entire life and she had worked hard her entire list from the situation good times be intolerable. it was not the physical charges await her down. she resented not been useful, not to us a meaningful. perhaps that is wh
about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progressive sea of educated elite and by their definitions were close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transit marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production codes that emphasize the universal american teens a teacher to some. god, fairplay and avoided sensationalism and other taboo faces. american movies sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally make fun of values to the work of equal such as keaton and charlie chaplin, but this is all done tongue-in-cheek and never was meant to undermine the system is self. by 1930, the u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europ
poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sounds harsh but maybe people of the middle-class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly, less for
and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the presidency of educated elites and by their definition close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transfer marinade for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers come the film in the literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production emphasizes universal american team, sexualization, other top devices. american movie sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralist and as one observer put it. they occasionally need people such as keaton and charlie chaplin. is it is all done tongue-in-cheek to undermine the system itself. in 1832 u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis, 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and american exceptionalism from the europeans want to be like mike. inflation, communist, agitation, ethnic unrest in the slow contradictions of versailles and cause the postwar european structure to crumble into
and india, evidence of overuse. this is a global phenomenon that we will have to tackle. provinces in canada 41 and 42 percent in some provinces of the state budget is health care. if you're doing that in a spending money on education, infrastructure, investment in society, technology. it's an enormous issue pretty tacky for your question. >> hi. >> hi. i'm debbie goldstein. i am a gastroenterologist, but i have spent a lot of time in primary care as well. i could spend an hour counterpointing and raising. there are so many issues. it is infinite. i wanted to make a couple of points. that is, the first thing is the whole issue of primary care. the primary care physician is being asked to be the foundation the primary care physician has the most responsibility of any other position. they have to know everything. they have to know what the right and left hand is doing. they have to coordinate. there responsible for everything that they refer people to. they have the least amount of time. there the ones that have to talk to that patient who went to the orthopedic surgeon and really could have b
, canada, the allies, most democracies not israel, india, and other countries, but most are protocol one. in the mid-70 -- mid-80 #s, they used protocol one, the other didn't, changed sides and so on. the side you followed the rules, guess what? they lost the war game. during the 1990s, american lawyers and human rights watch and amnesty international charged the united states air force with serious violations of the laws of war during the bombing campaign in kosovo and yugoslavia bringing these before the tribunal for the former yugoslavia using one as the rules. amnesty internationals cry the failure to give effective warning before bombing. human rights watch complained the u.s. air force was too concerned with ensuring pilot safety. these are american writers writing this, complaining about the american air force, too worried about the safety of american service members. these are the global rules. people talk about global rules, these are the global rules. it's an example of transnational politics, a new kind of politics. the violations of the law of war were based on protocol one.
with that and the regulators are the same is true in europe and china and india. same is the same is true and brazil. this country deals with gaps between the rich and poor, agriculture, and earthen industrialize an evolving in much the same way that we're going to have to on the global stage for a the problem has been solved and can be solved. >> host: good afternoon, we have a caller from new york city. >> caller: hello, i'm so happy you're taking my call. my question is this fiscal cliff that we are approaching. if president obama allows it to happen, what kind of catastrophe are you talking about? i'm kind of concerned? so negatively will this affect the industry? how bad will it really be out there on wall street and main street? >> guest: well, let's say there are a bunch of people where the congress is involved, democrats and republicans have a role to play in whether we resolve this or not. the fact that we litigate to this extent, we are leaving the american people what the risks exposed with the fiscal squibb on time, it wants be outraged that it's generated. the fiscal cliff is a problem.
of western europe, canada, most of our allies, most democracies -- not israel, india and some other countries -- but most countries are due to adhere to protocol i. during the '80s the united states conducted a series of war games, they changed sides and so on and the side that you follow protocol i rules, guess what? they always lost the war game. during the 1990s at amnesty international charged the united nations -- charged the united states air force with serious violations of the laws of war during the bombing campaigns in kosovo and yugoslavia. they brought these charges before a u.n.-sponsored international criminal tribunal for the former yugoslavia which uses protocol i, so amnesty international decried the consistent failure to give effective warning to civilians before bombing. human rights watch complained that the u.s. air force was too concerned with insuring pilot safety. these were american lawyers writing this, complaining about the american air force, too worried about the safety of american service members. so these are the global rules. when people talk about global rules,
are on facebook, making it the third-largest nation in the world after india and china. it has its own currency, dispute resolution of issues. viewers starting a band, you can get fans through it. you can use facebook and twitter and youtube to topple a government. it is much harder to put down a revolution that is occurring in a thousand places or more over the web than to kill a charismatic leader or bombed headquarters. you can really make some progress by the way it is set out. but if you are a new citizen of facebook, you may not realize what you're getting yourself into. in part it's because they spoke as a term of service shift without warning. so usually it is one lie, but in 2008, they changed it so your friends and relatives can see it as being public. these americans were critics of the iranian government. what happened was these pictures become public. friends and relatives were beat up for something as simple as your friends, which could make a difference. and in so many highs and lows of social networks and twitter and, you know, e-mail. we have seen the arab spring. we have seen
, a mere half, india must be. these are great, great journalists. and did israel credit. so i think that's a frustration for many of us middle east is that we saw possibilities in oslo and in the relationship between a soccer game and king hussein. i knew king hussein uncovered rypien. and with the assassination where lots advantage in israel after the united states has essentially become captive to really rapacious right-wing. for instance, the israeli foreign terror of the deer, lieberman who is openly called for the ethnic cleansing of israeli, arabs and palestinians was a bubble when i first got to jerusalem in 1988. for me it's really a debate about the health of the middle east and the help of the israeli state itself. i don't think that responding as historical injustice through the use of force and occupation is in the live for the state of israel itself. at the same time, of course adamantly opposed and there are those within the arab world to call for that is action of the state of israel. most states, including iran, spent a lot of time in pine ridge for historical injustices
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)